Past Event

Intergenerational Jam Session

Described by critic Gary Giddins as “one of the most compellingly original trombonists,” Ray Anderson is by turns a supremely lyrical player and bold texturalist, a warmly natural-sounding soloist and footloose innovator. Broadening the trombone’s sonic scope with his extended techniques, brilliantly unconventional use of the plunger mute and demonstrative vocal-like tones, he played a major role in reawakening interest in the instrument in the ’80s.

Named five straight years as best trombonist in the Down Beat Critics Poll and declared “the most exciting slide brass player of his generation” by the Penguin Guide to Jazz on CD, Anderson has shown remarkable range. He has led or co-led a daunting assortment of tradition-minded and experimental groups, big bands, blues and funk projects and even a trombone quartet. He is recognized as an original and compelling composer and has recorded more than 100 of his own compositions with these groups. He has also demonstrated his special supportive skills on a remarkably wide assortment of albums by Anthony Braxton, David Murray, Charlie Haden’s Liberation Music Orchestra, Dr. John, the George Gruntz Concert Jazz Band, Luther Allison, Bennie Wallace, Henry Threadgill, Barbara Dennerlein, John Scofield, Roscoe Mitchell, the New York Composers Orchestra, Sam Rivers’ Rivbea Orchestra and many others.

Anderson is gifted teacher and has long been in demand for workshops and master-classes around the world. He has been the Director of Jazz Studies at Stony Brook University since 2003. “I really enjoy teaching,” he says. “The energy of the students and the possibility of inspiring them make the job intensely rewarding.”

Anderson has received grants from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Fund for U.S. Artists at International Festivals, the Oberon Foundation and Chamber Music America. In 2001 he became a John S. Guggenheim Fellow.

Recent releases include “Hear You Say” The Marty Ehrlich, Ray Anderson Quartet; “Sweet Chicago Suite” for his Pocket Brass Band; “Love Notes,” a duo of standards with guitarist Steve Salerno; and “Being The Point” a quartet record by Anderson’s newest group, which features Gary Versace on Hammond B3 organ, Salerno on guitar, and long-time associate Tommy Campbell on drums. He recently recorded at solo trombone album which will come out in 2020.

Jazz Power Initiative’s Intergenerational Jazz Jam brings together singers, musicians, dancers, spoken word artists and audiences of all ages to experience the power of jazz, community, and swing. Jams take place on the second Sunday of each month from 2-5 PM at the National Jazz Museum in Harlem located at 58 West 129th Street in Manhattan.

Pianist and master educator Eli Yamin has a way of bringing people together through jazz. He’s a blues evangelist who partners an infectious love for the music with a passion for sharing it in ways that everyone can understand. His musical workshops, full of clapping, singing, dance and play, invite listeners to feel the music deep in their bones.

Here, Yamin and friends kick off the afternoon with a romping set of blues and jazz, followed by an all-ages jam session open to musicians, singers, and dancers of every stripe.